Galleries

Follow the Artists In The book, 100 Artists of the Brandywine Valley copy

100 Artists of the Brandywine Valley Book CoverSince the publication of  100 Artists of the Brandywine Valley (Schiffer Publishing, Ltd.),  I have either promoted the activities of the artists in the book or have been part of joint book signings and art exhibits.

One on-going joint venture is my participation in the annual Chester County Studio Tour.  http://www.chestercountystudiotour.com/

Jeff Schaller's studio
Jeff Schaller’s studio and home open on the Studio Tour, 2008

 From my post from West Chester FIg magazine: It’s a “must” for anyone who enjoys seeing beautiful properties and meeting interesting people.  I’m referring to both the artists and the people you tend to meet along the way, but full disclosure:  I will be signing copies of my book, 100 Artists of the Brandywine.

 According to the organizer, Jeff Schaller (who is one of the “100” in my book),  the annual tour grew out of several years of discussions when  a group of local artists held monthly meetings at their studios to critique each other’s artwork.  

Another annual event for many of the “100” artists is the Historic Yellow Springs Art Show. 

Academy Students at Yellow Springs, encaustic on board
This painting was created using a multi-step process that included a silkscreen print made from a pen & ink drawing and securing the image to a board with encaustic paint.

Surprisingly, I was juried into the show in 2011 and have enjoyed many sales there.  Click here to view my work and that of the other exhibitors at Historic Yellow Springs.

 

I created this encaustic painting from photos I took from the Justice Center's parking garage in downtown West Chester. I several scenes taken from this spot.
I created this encaustic painting from photos I took from the Justice Center’s parking garage in downtown West Chester. I completed several scenes taken from this spot.

 Me in Jamaica

Some of the paintings shown here were completed during one of my five art trips to Treasure Beach, Jamaica
A message from my teachers Alan and Libbie Soffer: We just can’t keep away from the balmy, musical sweetness of Jamaica. This year’s trip, February 7th to 14th, 2015 marks the 7th workshop at “Calabash House,” an all-inclusive B&B overlooking the lovely warm waters of Treasure Beach.
For more information about the Soffers’ “Art Incubator,” visit Alan’s site at www.alansofferart.com

 

 

 

threepanelsQuillman
This work, “A Seat for My Ancestors,” was photographed as a work-in-progress. It was created in Jamaica using stencils made from ordinary contact paper used to line shelves

 

 

 

Yellow Springs gazebo  Shower

Household Help, collage by C . Quillman
My collage, “Household Help” was accepted into the “Reigning Cats And Dogs” art show at the Wayne Art Center in Wayne, PA. Opens April 5 and continues through May 4, 2013

Continue reading Follow the Artists In The book, 100 Artists of the Brandywine Valley copy

Follow the Artists In The book, 100 Artists of the Brandywine Valley

100 Artists of the Brandywine Valley Book CoverSince the publication of  100 Artists of the Brandywine Valley (Schiffer Publishing, Ltd.),  I have either promoted the activities of the artists in the book or have been part of joint book signings and art exhibits.

One on-going joint venture is my participation in the annual Chester County Studio Tour.

Hope you join me and 53 participating artists May 18th and May 19, 2013.

According to the organizer, Jeff Schaller – whose

Jeff Schaller's studio
Jeff Schaller’s studio

backyard art studio  shown here is practically a neighborhood landmark –  the annual tour grew out of several years of discussions when  the group held monthly meetings at their studios to critique one another’s art work.  

The artists came up with the idea of grouping several artists in two locations, Schaller’s studio and that of David Oleski, located on a property featuring a large pond, a short drive away through  scenic woods and rolling hills.  

For this year’s tour, there will be a considerable expansion –  53 artists in 23 studios across Chester County. .

For a complete list of the tour’s exhibiting artists,  click here

Academy Students at Yellow Springs, encaustic on board
This painting was created using a multi-step process that included a silkscreen print made from a pen & ink drawing and securing the image to a board with encaustic paint.

Another annual event is the Historic Yellow Springs Art Show .
Join me at the opening reception, April 26 from 7 to 10 p.m.  The exhibit continues through May 12th.

Household Help, collage by C . Quillman
My collage, “Household Help” was accepted into the “Reigning Cats And Dogs” art show at the Wayne Art Center in Wayne, PA. Opens April 5 and continues through May 4, 2013

Historic Yellow Springs is featured in  100 Artists of the Brandywine Valley.
Although I have had book signings at the event in the past,  this is my second year participating as one of the exhibiting artists.

Click here to view my work and that of the other exhibitors.

Walking The East End, Part Two

Spences Restaurant before restoration, Photo courtesy of CCHS
Spences Restaurant before restoration, Photo courtesy of CCHS

Part Two includes two additional tours: 

 The “Uptown” Tour  

 The 21 sites on this tour can be generally divided into Civil War-era sites such as the Lincoln Building and the former offices of an Abolitionist newspaper as well as sites related to black entrepreneurship in the 19th century and in recent times. 

 As it is described in this booklet’s introduction,  West Chester’s most successful black-owned enterprises – Burns’ Great Oyster House, Spence’s Restaurant, and  the Ganges’ Ice Cream and Confectionary Shop – thrived at a time of explosive growth,  in the 1850s and the 1900s.  Even then, they could not be described as part of a “colored aristocracy.”  They served a clientele that included judges and Court House personnel yet they typically saw their fraternal and civic lives as rooted in the black community.

Spences Restuarant, 1920s Courtesy of the Spence family
Spences Restuarant, 1920s Courtesy of the Spence family

 “Uptown,” as residents of the East End still call it, includes one residential area: South Walnut Street.  The beautiful Victorian homes are representative of those built by craftsmen for the artisan and working classes including black residents. Part of the area was developed in 1844 by Robert Mercer, who came to West Chester as an orphan bound to a Swedish shoemaker.  The region’s first  Presbyterian church built for African-Americans is also located here. 

 A third category of sites might be described as those associated with Civil Rights activism including the  movie theaters and restaurants where Bayard Rustin challenged West Chester’s white community to uphold its liberal heritage.

The Spokes Works. Courtesy of CCHS
The Spokes Works. Courtesy of CCHS

The industrial Tour

The 13 sites  on this tour includes “Mechanics Alley,” where a former crayon factory is open to the public (now Rose Valley Restorations) as well as 8 sites along East Union Street.   The buildings at E. Union and S. Franklin Streets have been occupied since the 1870s when they included a grist mill and metal foundry.  These buildings overlooked West Chester’s largest brick yards.

 Owned by one of the Civil War’s most celebrated veterans, Henry R. Guss, the brick yards extended to Bolmar Street. They were later occupied by Hoffman’s Lumber Yards, but the area still shows glimpses of the past: a row of brick homes Guss constructed for his workers still stands.   At the corner of Union and Adams Streets, one can see the original buildings of  a  long-standing mushroom cannery,  E.H. Jacobs Company, which became nationally known as the producer of “B&B” mushrooms and other products.  

 The “Industrial” tour is the longest tour in the booklet, extending to Lacey Street and the boundary  of an early Irish community known as “Riggtown.”  Within the same neighborhood, the West Chester Railroad Heritage Association keeps its trains in a yard 

that recalls a busy era when the Pennsylvania Railroad  maintained its largely freight switching yard near the same spot.  The railroad turntable is documented on the map in this booklet, but no longer remains. 

 In fact, the former vestiges of an industrial presence—the mushroom factory, the National Phone Co. and old 30-acre Wyeth Lab site—have disappeared.  Hopefully, this part of the East End will have a positive future.